D.C. student’s family sues for $11 million after alleged sex with female substitute teacher

The family of a 17-year-old D.C. high school student has filed a lawsuit for $11 million, claiming a substitute teacher maliciously made sexual contact with him earlier this month.

Symone Greene, 22, was working at Options Public Charter School in Northeast D.C. Friday, Oct. 17 when she first met the victim, a football player at the school.

The student, who is described as having a learning disability, told police he was working as an office assistant and helped Greene twice that day in her English class. The student said he flirted with Greene during class, gave her his cell phone number, then texted her, asking if she was “kinky.”

According to documents, the two later met up in her classroom, where she allegedly performed oral sex on the teen. The victim recorded the sex act and later shared the video with his teammates and a childhood friend.

Greene allegedly sent the teen a text message over the weekend asking him not to tell anyone.

The teen’s mother filed a $11 million lawsuit Tuesday in Prince George’s County against Greene, the D.C. Public Charter School Board, the court-appointed receiver and custodian of Options Public Charter School Joshua Kern and SOS Personnel, the private Delaware company that initially hired Greene.

The lawsuit claims Greene was “unqualified to serve as a teacher” for at-risk students at the school and shouldn’t have been hired as a subsitute teacher in the first place.

It goes on to say Greene had deliberately and maliciously made sexual contact with the victim that day, and exposed him to possible sexually transmitted diseases.

The lawsuit also claims another teacher could have stopped the inappropriate contact between the victim and Greene, and says the school’s “no cell phone” policy was clearly violated.

Although the age of consent in D.C. is 16, Greene was charged because she was the teen’s teacher. According to D.C. law, age-of-consent rules are not in play in when it comes to “significant relationships,” which include teachers and their students.

She pleaded not guilty to first-degree sexual assault against a minor in a significant relationship.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story incorrectly reported the sum of the lawsuit to be $3 million. The family’s attorney says the family is seeking $11 million for all counts listed in the lawsuit.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Christina Sommers talks Gamergaters

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Feminists insists a WWII statue be removed because it depicts ‘sexual assault’

Katherine Timpf writes at National Review about a French feminist group that insists the statue below depicts sexual assault.

The statue, placed near Pegasus Bridge in Northern France to mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, depicts a sailor kissing a woman to celebrate V-J Day in New York City on August 14, 1945.

But the French feminist group Osez Le Féminisme has claimed that what the statue actually portrays is the sexual assault of a woman who did not give verbal consent before being kissed, and the group is petitioning to have it removed immediately.

Alfred Eisenstaedt, who took the original photograph, has said that George Mendonsa, the sailor depicted in the image, had been haphazardly kissing any woman who came close to him, without taking the time to explicitly ask for verbal consent.

Osez Le Féminisme maintains that the statue is clearly nothing more than the disgusting depiction of a sexual assault in progress.

“The sailor could have laughed with these women, hugged them, asked them if he could kiss them with joy,” the group told The Times of London.

“No, he chose to grab them with a firm hand to kiss them,” they continued. “It was an assault.”

The identity of the woman in the photograph has been disputed.

According to museum director Stéphane Grimaldi, the woman is a nurse named Edith Shain, who stated she had not been assaulted in any way.

The feminist group, however, said that the woman is actually an Austrian named Greta Zimmer Friedman.

Friedman has been quoted as saying: “I wasn’t kissing him. He was kissing me.” But she sharply rejected the assault claim after a 2012 blog post picked up on that quote to say the photo was an example of “The Selective Blindness of Rape Culture.”

“I can’t think of anybody who considered that as an assault,” Friedman told Navy Times, adding that she and Mendonsa — who were strangers at the time — stayed in touch over the years. “It was a happy event.”

Posted in Uncategorized | 27 Comments

Female teacher who sought sex with 10-year-old boy walks free

Shocking and disgusting on every level. Amazing, too, how understated the whole ‘mother of eight’ thing is in this article. 

A primary school teacher who wanted to have sex with her 10-year-old student, and had his name tattooed on her chest, has walked free from court.

County Court judge Mark Taft said he was at a complete loss to understand why mother of eight Diane Brimble, 47, had engaged in “such utterly inappropriate conduct which must dismay every parent.”

“You breached the trust reposed in you by [the boy's] parents who properly expected that a classroom teacher would care for their son in a professional manner,” Judge Taft said on Thursday when sentencing Brimble on a two-year community correction order and 200 hours of unpaid community work.

Brimble will be placed on the sex offenders register for eight years, be assessed and treated for any mental health condition, take part in offender treatment programs and has lost her career as a teacher.

“The scale of your obsessive behaviour was demonstrated by your tattooing [the boy's] name on your chest with an infinity symbol, your endeavours to move your own children into the primary school where [the boy] had transferred and the letters that you penned which spoke of your undying love for him,” Judge Taft said.

One letter read in part: “I can’t write how much I miss you because there just aren’t enough words … Though you will be so far away when I leave I will still see you every night in my dreams just as I do now. Infinite love, forever in my heart.”

Judge Taft said it “beggars belief” that a “mature-aged woman” would write such a letter to her 10 -year-old student.

Brimble, of Hamilton, was found guilty by a jury sitting in Warrnambool of one count of committing an indecent act with a child under 16 between January 1 and April 19, 2013.

She was acquitted of five other charges. The prosecution did not call for Brimble to be jailed given she was not convicted of sexually abusing the boy.

Brimble had hugged the boy at her house and asked him if he wanted to sleep with her. The boy asked her what she meant and she said “sex”.

The boy pushed Brimble’s hands away as she kissed him on the cheek and told him she loved him. He told her he was not old enough to have sex but Brimble told him, “You are when you are at my house.”

The boy’s father told the court he discovered what was happening when he saw inappropriate Facebook and text messages from Brimble to the boy.

“I couldn’t understand why [the boy] was agitated and refused to look at either of his parents,” he father said in his victim impact statement.

“As it turns out it was due to him being subjected to deplorable and indecent actions by a person in a position of trust.”

When the boy changed schools, Brimble toured his new school and tried to enrol her own children there.

“She tried to manipulate [the boy] to think that she loved him and that his parents did not. This hurts me to the very core,” the father said.

“I feel angry that if it was a 46-year-old man and a 10-year-old girl that it would most likely be a different outcome … I feel angry and betrayed by the Education Department who did nothing to remove this evil woman from other children,” he said.

“To think a woman would get a tattoo with my child’s name as a sign of her undying love for [the boy] baffles me. I would like Brimble to endure the pain of removing name forever.”

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Children of divorce need both parents

Leslie Loftis writes in The Federalist about the needs of children in divorced families.

What is the best custody arrangement for children after divorce? Most of us outside of family lawyers and courts don’t think about that question until we are faced with it. And then adults tend to choose administrative stability, figuring the kids are as exhausted and spent as themselves. Children of divorce face such an upheaval that it makes sense to adults that the children need time to rest and recover, and so we prioritize routine.

Certainly our custody assumptions support this kind of stability. Typically, one parent gets primary custody, while the other gets Wednesday evenings, every other weekend, half the summer, and alternating holidays. This is so normalized that I was recently encouraged to host a women’s event on a Wednesday night because that’s when the kids of divorce are with their dads. It is widespread and predictable.

But those custody norms are informed by old research. We have new research now. In fact, we have enough research that we have long-term studies of children of divorce and meta studies—studies of those studies, a few of which I covered here last summer.

Grant Children Their Rights, Too

What children want and what children need—what they see as stability—is open access to both parents. From a 2000 paper by William V. Fabricus and Jeffery Hall on young adult perspectives on living arrangements after a divorce, reporting on their follow-up in the late ’90s with children of divorce they had studied in the ’70s:

Earlier research on younger children’s perspectives on living arrangements has demonstrated that children desire free and frequent access to noncustodial parents. For example, Rosen (1979) found that 60% of children wanted unrestricted contact, regardless of whether the noncustodial parent was mother or father. Children repeatedly insisted that being able to see the noncustodial parents whenever they wished and being able to see that parent often made their parents’ divorces tolerable for them.

Kelly and Wallerstein (1977) reported that young children viewed the typical every-other-weekend visitation arrangement as severely inadequate. ‘The only younger children reasonably content with the visiting situation were those 7- and 8-year-olds visiting 2 or 3 times a week, most often by pedaling to their father’s apartment on a bicycle’ (p. 52).

…The perspectives of young children, although compelling, have not had much influence in public policy debates about custody and visitation. Young children’s feelings may be suspected of being relatively temporary, malleable, and ultimately not strongly connected to measurable outcomes. The public policy debate about custody and visitation has generally been framed in terms of parents’ (and, most recently, grandparents’) rights rather than children’s wishes (Mason, 1999). Thus, it is important that Wallerstein and Lewis (1998) have recently reported on the longitudinal follow-up of the perspectives of these children now that they are adults. Their report is based on a subsample of 25 respondents who were the youngest (now ages 27 to 32) in the longitudinal study.

Wallerstein and Lewis (1998) found that many of their respondents reported that their visitation schedules with their fathers had been too disruptive and too inflexible and that when this was true they got little enjoyment or benefit from visitation in the way of enhanced relationships with their fathers. As adults, they feel strongly now, as they did then, that their wishes should have been taken into account, and they remain angry and resentful that they were not.

But the children’s desires have had a hard time breaking through the conventional wisdom. Myths about single-adult attachment and simple routines persist. Considering the relative advantages for children of intact families, that children need both parents should not surprise us. Yet it does.

Historical and Practical Ruts

Divorce wasn’t commonplace until the 1970’s. Before then, social scientists studied orphaned children and mother and young child attachment. Mothers were the primary caregivers of children, so studying them first made sense. Then, when the divorce rate spiked, courts didn’t have other information to advise them about the best custody arrangements for children. They granted primary mother care based on the only available research and the prevailing cultural practice. Then social science started to study the effects of a fractured family or father absence.

Courts should grant shared custody to divorcing parents unless presented with clear and convincing evidence this arrangement is not in the best interest of the child.
After about four decades of such studies, we have another answer to “What is best for the children?” (Or really we find another example of being led astray by partial data that our common sense should have warned us to be wary of back in the ’70s.) Absent extenuating circumstances such as abuse, children want and children need open access to both parents.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A Revolution Against Campus Sexual Assault

New York magazine calls the new revolution a “brilliantly plotted movement against assault.” We’d call it a brilliantly plotted movement against men.

And here’s the question no one dares to ask: Why did this so-called rape epidemic not exist thirty years ago? Did a bunch of bad men come out of the woodwork? Or have women changed in a dramatic way over the past forty years? The answer is obvious.

Note: The following article is looooong.

“Want to meet at my dorm? Less carrying for me.”

Emma Sulkowicz, a.k.a. the international sensation “mattress girl,” is emailing from her phone in her Columbia University dorm high up over Morningside Heights, where she lives in a single room within a six-person suite. “My friends and I got the first place in the housing lottery for seniors last year,” she says non­chalantly, leading the way through a concrete-block hallway, in purple flip-flops the same color as her painted toes, as well as a light-blue cropped tee featuring a moose with sunglasses over the words FEARLESS LEADER, commemorating a river-rafting trip for freshmen.

As you may already know, given how viral Sulkowicz’s image has gone in the past few weeks, that’s the outdoor-­orientation program that preceded Sulkowicz’s alleged rape by another orientation leader, which was followed by a Columbia-adjudicated hearing during which the university found her assailant not guilty—a verdict she began protesting, this September, by carry­ing a mattress around campus until Columbia expels her assailant.

A few years ago, an Ivy League student going public about her rape, telling the world her real name—let alone trying to attract attention by lugging around a mattress—would have been a rare bird. In America, after all, we still assume rape survivors want, and need, their identities protected by the press. But shattering silence, in 2014, means not just coming out with an atrocity tale about your assault but offering what Danielle Dirks, a sociologist at Occidental, calls “an atrocity tale about how poorly you were treated by the people you pay $62,500 a year to protect you.”

By owning those accusations, and pointing a finger not only at assailants but also the American university, the ivory tower of privilege, these survivors have built the most effective, organized anti-rape movement since the late ’70s. Rape activists now don’t talk much about women’s self-care and protection like they did in the ’90s with Take Back the Night marches, self-defense classes, and cans of Mace. Today, the militant cry is aimed at the university: Kick the bastards out.

Taking a seat in a wood-and-wool chair of the blend shared by dorms and doctors’ waiting rooms, Sulkowicz starts to tell her tale. At 21, in barely detectable Invisalign braces, she’s the type of hipster-nerd who rules the world these days, with the mellow demeanor and direct way of speaking of an Apple genius-bar clerk, except she giggles nervously when worried she’s said the wrong thing.

The Japanese-Chinese-Jewish daughter of Manhattan psychiatrists, she was a club fencer and an A student at Dalton on the Upper East Side. At Columbia, Sulkowicz thought she’d focus on mechanical physics—she liked the way you could draw a diagram to solve a problem, see the answer—but wound up drawn to visual arts instead. She also joined Alpha Delta Phi, Columbia’s co-ed “hipster frat.” As she puts it dryly, “Only the most hipster of the hipster kids can get in.” That’s where she met Paul, a film fanatic and rower. “He was a nice person,” she says matter-of-factly, “a cool person who was secretly really crazy.”

Toward the end of freshman year, the two students signed up to help lead the next year’s outdoor-orientation program, taking a training trip down the Delaware River. There were an odd number of students on the trip, so everyone sat two to a canoe except Paul, who was in a kayak. “He would paddle way out ahead of everyone so that he didn’t have to talk to anyone,” she says. They had sex twice. He went to Europe for the summer.

When he returned, at the beginning of sophomore year, Sulkowicz was a committee head for orientation. “Paul was really needy,” she says. “He asked me to help carry his bags, and I was like, ‘I’m organizing food for 400 freshmen.’ ” One night there was a party for the orientation leaders. In the ivy-covered courtyard outside Wien Hall, Paul kissed Sulkowicz, who says that she was sober except for a sip of gin-and-Sprite. He was buzzed and carrying a handle of vodka. While they were having consensual sex in her dorm room, she alleges that he suddenly pushed her legs against her chest, choked her, slapped her, and anally penetrated her as she struggled and clearly repeated “No.”

Click here to read the rest of the article.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Watch Out, College Men: CA Governor Jerry Brown (D) signs ‘Yes Means Yes’ sexual assault law

From The Washington Examiner

Gov. Jerry Brown, D-Calif., has signed into law the state’s controversial “yes means yes” sexual consent bill for disciplinary procedures at public colleges, which defines consent narrowly and leaves accused students without due process rights.

California’s bill, S.B.967, is the first in the nation to define consent as an “affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement,” but also codify into law that a “lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent.”

Non-verbal consent, such as a nod, is acceptable under the law, but because the law’s text requires consent to be “ongoing throughout a sexual activity and can be revoked at any time,” the likelihood that a university could determine signals were misinterpreted is high.

That’s because the law gives no due process rights to the accused. It requires universities provide accusers (labeled “victims,” which itself suggests a bias) with counseling services, but doesn’t offer any services for the accused.

The law also codifies the “preponderance of evidence” standard for campus disciplinary proceedings instead of the “without a reasonable doubt” criminal standard. This is a low threshold for establishing guilt and means that a panel of campus advisers has to be just 50.01 percent sure the accuser is telling the truth.

The Obama administration, citing exaggerated statistics on campus sexual assault, has put pressure on colleges and universities to combat sexual assault using this standard, which will likely result in more young men being branded as rapists whether they are or not.

Without due process rights for the accused — like access to legal representation or the ability to cross-examine the accuser — miscarriages of justice will occur. In many such cases, the police refuse to press charges because “he said, she said” may prove insufficient evidence for a criminal trial under procedures that fit within constitutional guidelines.

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Two female teachers arrested for having threesome with male student

From Uniladmag.com…

Shelley Dufresne, 32, and Rachel Respess, 24, had sex with the 16-year-old male student of the Destrehan High school in Louisiana, USA.

According to reports, the pair took the student back to their shared house after a football game, where they then had a sexual encounter.

They were arrested after rumours began to spread around the school. How they thought a 16-year-old wouldn’t brag about this is beyond me.

Police then questioned the student in question, who told them his version of events that eventually led to the arrest of both teachers.

Students at the school reportedly also told officers that the three had been meeting for threesomes regularly and had also filmed multiple encounters.

Dufresne and Respess have both been charged with carnal knowledge of a juvenile and contributing to the delinquency of a juvenile.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments