‘Withholding sex’ now considered ‘sexual violence’ at U. of Michigan

Unbelievable. Katherine Timpf of National Review reports on one college’s view of sexually violent behavior.

The University of Michigan has released a list of relationship behaviors that it considers violent and abusive — including “withholding sex.”

“Discounting the partner’s feelings regarding sex,” “criticizing the partner sexually,” and “having sex with other people” are also examples of “sexual violence,” according to the list.

The school also offers definitions of domestic abuse. Under the section for “verbal or psychological abuse,” it states that not only is “insulting the partner” considered “abuse,” so is “ignoring the partner’s feelings.”

Janet Bloomfield, social media director for A Voice for Men, explained the dangers of such broad definitions of “violence” in an e-mail to the College Fix.

“When things like ‘withholding sex’ and ‘ignoring a partner’s feelings’ are framed as a pattern of behavior that is abusive, they are not only pathologizing normal relationship behaviors, but they are opening the door for vindictive or spurned partners to make allegations that can have profound effects for the accused,” she said.

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Female teacher has sex with student and gets no jail time

Joe Kovacs reports at WND on Oklahoma teacher who allegedly had sex with her 17-year-old student.

An Oklahoma high-school teacher charged with raping her 17-year-student is getting no jail time, leaving the parents of her victim stunned and outraged.

Erin Kathleen Queen of Sand Springs, Okla., was arrested March 17, 2012, after she was found at the Candlewood Suites hotel in Tulsa with the teen son of Shasta and Adam Belty. Queen was a 27-year-old English teacher at Charles Page High School at the time.

Although Queen was originally charged with second-degree rape and contributing to the delinquency of a minor for supplying the boy with vodka, the case was dismissed this month when Queen pleaded guilty to a different felony count of contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

She received three years of probation, was fined $600 and ordered to surrender her teacher’s license.

According to Title 21, Section 1115 of the Oklahoma Statutes, sex may be considered rape if “… the victim is at least sixteen (16) years of age and is less than eighteen (18) years of age and is a student, or under the legal custody or supervision of any public or private elementary or secondary school, junior high or high school, or public vocational school, and engages in sexual intercourse with a person who is eighteen (18) years of age or older and is an employee of the same school system.”

On March 21, Tulsa County District Judge William Kellough gave Queen a three-year suspended sentence with no prison time and no community service hours.

The outcome has the teen’s parents livid.

“I think it’s crap,” Adam Belty told the Tulsa World. “Should it be rape? No. Should she be charged with a sexual count for something? Yes, but the way (it) was explained, there’s no count (less than) second-degree rape that they can charge her with.”

“It’s very frustrating to us that she basically got a slap on the wrist,” said the boy’s mother, Shasta Belty.

“I cussed. I cried. I totally disagreed with it. (Assistant District Attorney Amanda Self) was under the impression that we were OK with a conviction as long as (Queen) never taught again. Well, we were OK with a conviction of the second-degree rape … or something that represents the sexual misconduct.”

The paper reports: “Within hours of Queen’s arrest, it seemed to the Beltys that the whole town of Sand Springs knew what had happened. Their son’s social circle grew smaller as friends and potential prom dates were prohibited from socializing with him. And as the lengthy legal process wore on, the options for his freshman year of college were limited by proximity so he could comply with subpoenas for his testimony.”

Shasta Belty says her son’s senior year was completely tainted.

“People look at this as, ‘I don’t know why he’s complaining,’ you know? They haven’t been in our shoes. … They know nothing about it,” she said.

Mrs. Belty told KTUL-TV she learned of the sexual relationship with a phone call to her son.

“He was reluctant to tell me but then he told me he was with Ms. Queen, Erin Queen. And I thought that name sounds familiar. And he said, ‘Mom, it’s my 5th-hour English teacher.’ And I died as a parent,” she told the station.

The Tulsa World reports the Beltys don’t believe current law in Oklahoma properly addresses offenses by female teachers, and “they think the legal system hesitates to call a consensual relationship between a student and teacher – especially a student and a female teacher – rape.”

“If they’re not going to punish this law to the fullest extent of it, then there should be (a law against) sexual misconduct with students,” Shasta Belty said. “There should be something.”

The district attorney’s office disagrees with the Beltys, claiming justice has been served.

“We believe a felony conviction holds this teacher accountable under the circumstances of this case,” the office said. “After speaking to the victim and the family, our office decided this was in the best interests of justice.”

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To Emma Watson: Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us.”

 Cathy Young writes in Time about Emma Watson’s HeforShe campaign.

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join.

Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys.

Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete.

Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers.

There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage.

Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly.

But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée.

Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help).

Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared?

Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts.

A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred.

Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role.

It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution.

Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us.”

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The College Rape Epidemic: Feminists’ Latest Scourge

Kevin D. Williamson writes about the fraud of campus rape at National Review.

Rape is a vicious crime, one that disproportionately affects poor women and incarcerated men, but Barack Obama knows his voters, and so his recent remarks on the subject were focused not on penitentiaries, broken families, or Indian reservations but on college campuses, where the despicable crime is bound up in a broader feminist Kulturkampf only tangentially related to the very real problem of sexual violence against women.

The subject is a maddening one. President Obama repeated the endlessly reiterated but thoroughly debunked claim that one in five women will be sexually assaulted in her college years. The actual rate is . . . sort of an interesting problem, the information being so inconsistent and contradictory that one almost suspects that it is so by design.

President Obama, who gives every indication of being committed to the bitter end to his belief in the omnipotence of his merest utterance, gave a speech in which he affirmed his position that rape is wicked and that we should discourage it. Instead of giving a content-free speech, he should have directed his Department of Justice to put together some definitive data on the question.

Much of the scholarly literature estimates that the actual rate is more like a tenth of that one-in-five rate, 2.16 percent, or 21.6 per 1,000 to use the conventional formulation. But that number is problematic, too, as are most of the numbers related to sexual assault, as the National Institute of Justice, the DoJ’s research arm, documents. For example, two surveys conducted practically in tandem produced victimization rates of 0.16 percent and 1.7 percent, respectively – i.e., the latter estimate was eleven times the former. The NIJ blames defective wording on survey questions.

This is a matter of concern because a comparison between the NIJ’s estimates of college-campus rape and the estimates of rape in the general population compiled by the DoJ’s National Crime Victimization Survey implies that the rate of rape among college students is more than ten times that of the general population.

It is not impossible that this is the case, but there is significant cause for skepticism. For example, in the general population college-age women have significantly lower rates of sexual assault than do girls twelve to seventeen, while a fifth of all rape victims are younger than twelve.

Most of the familiar demographic trends in violent crime are reflected in the rape statistics: Poor women are sexually assaulted at twice the rate of women in households earning $50,000 a year or more; African American women are victimized at higher rates than are white women, while Native American women are assaulted at twice the rate of white women; divorced and never-married women are assaulted at seven times the rate of married women; women in urban communities are assaulted at higher rates than those in the suburbs, and those in rural areas are assaulted at dramatically higher rates.

But there is at least one significant departure from the usual trends in violent crime: Only about 9 percent of those raped are men.

It is probably the case that the prevalence of sexual assault on college campuses is wildly exaggerated—not necessarily in absolute terms, but relative to the rate of sexual assault among college-aged women with similar demographic characteristics who are not attending institutions of higher learning. The DOJ hints at this in its criticism of survey questions, some of which define “sexual assault” so loosely as to include actions that “are not criminal.”

This might explain why so many women who answer survey questions in a way consistent with their being counted victims of sexual assault frequently display such a blasé attitude toward the events in question and so rarely report them. As the DoJ study puts it: “The most commonly reported response — offered by more than half the students — was that they did not think the incident was serious enough to report. More than 35 percent said they did not report the incident because they were unclear as to whether a crime was committed or that harm was intended.”

If you are having a little trouble getting your head around a definition of “sexual assault” so liberal that it includes everything from forcible rape at gunpoint to acts that not only fail to constitute crimes under the law but leave the victims “unclear as to whether harm was intended,” then you are, unlike much of our culture, still sane.

Of all the statistics and evidence that are prevalent in the discussion of sexual assault, there is one datum conspicuous in its absence: the fact that sexual assault has been cut by nearly two-thirds since 1995. Under the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ apples-to-apples year-over-year comparison, sexual assault has declined 64 percent since the Clinton years. That is excellent news, indeed, but it does not feed the rape-epidemic narrative, and so it must be set aside.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

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Patient, 60, Says Nurse, 33, Forced Sex On Him

Another from The Smoking Gun

SEPTEMBER 17—A female nurse “initiated unsolicited sexual relations, including intercourse” with a hospitalized Illinois man who was awaiting a heart transplant, according to a lawsuit filed Monday against the woman and the hospital where her employment was later terminated.

In a Cook County Circuit Court complaint, retiree John Cantone, 60, accused Rachel Shaper of battery and alleged that the Advocate Christ Medical Center in suburban Chicago was negligent in supervising the 33-year-old registered nurse.

Cantone, whose wife Laura is co-plaintiff in the lawsuit, charges that Shaper, seen at right, “had a propensity to initiate unauthorized physical contact with patients.” The nurse, he added, “had attempted and/or succeeded” in initiating similar contact with other patients in her care.

According to the complaint, Cantone was in his hospital bed at 9 PM when Shaper entered Room 916 East and “initiated unsolicited sexual relations, including intercourse.” The October 12, 2012 encounter, Cantone claimed, occurred in the hospital’s cardiac intensive care unit, where he was awaiting a new heart.

At the time of the alleged sexual acts, Cantone was “medicated with various drugs and was under electronic monitoring,” according to the complaint.

Cantone’s lawsuit seeks in excess of $200,000 in damages. The complaint was filed about a month before the two-year statue of limitations on battery and negligence claims would have expired.

Illinois state records reveal that Shaper was fired from the Oak Lawn hospital for “crossing professional boundaries with a patient.” Those Department of Professional and Financial Regulation documents do not further describe the nature of Shaper’s boundary crossing (or whether Cantone was the patient in question).

In January, Shaper was formally reprimanded by state officials for failing to report that she had been terminated by Advocate Christ Medical Center. At a disciplinary conference last year, Shaper admitted failing to disclose details of her termination.

In mitigation, Shaper’s lawyer argued that the nurse had cooperated with state officials and had “voluntarily completed a boundary course.” A state consent order includes the contention by Shaper that “no patient harm” resulted from her actions, and that she “has been licensed since 2009 without prior discipline.”

While the state reprimand goes on Shaper’s record, her license remains active, and is valid until May 2016.

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Woman charged with sex attack on sleeping man

From The Smoking Gun

SEPTEMBER 12–A Seattle woman has been charged with raping a man who told cops he awoke in his bed to find his attacker sexually assaulting him while she had his hands pinned down, according to a police report.

Chantae Gilman, 26, was charged this week in connection with the alleged June 2013 attack inside the 31-year-old victim’s Seattle apartment. Gilman has prior felony convictions for attempted robbery and possession of a stolen vehicle, as well as several misdemeanor convictions, according to court records.

As detailed in a probable cause affidavitprepared by a Seattle Police Department detective, the victim told cops that while he did not know Gilman, she was an acquaintance of another man who lives in his duplex. He described Gilman as “a drug user in the area.”

The man said that on the night of the attack he attended a birthday party for the neighbor whom Gilman knows. “Once arriving home he fell asleep on his bed,” Detective Roger Ishimitsu reported. “Victim slept very hard due to a long day.”

At 2 AM, the man told cops, he awoke to find the 5’ 7”, 240-pound Gilman on top of him. The victim said that his erect penis was inside Gilman, who had the man’s“hands pinned down over his head,” as first reported by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

While Gilman ignored demands to get off him, the man said, he was “able to work his way out from underneath” her. Gilman, he added, had “told him to be quiet.” The man subsequently succeeded in pushing Gilman from his home. Later that day, he went to the Harborview Medical Center for a sexual assault examination.

Court records do not reveal how Gilman (seen above) got into the victim’s apartment.

When questioned by cops, Gilman denied knowing the victim and said she did not recall being at his home or having sex with him. “She said that she has a mental illness and suffers from Bipolar disorder and Psychosis,” wrote Detective Ishimitsu.

A DNA sample collected from Gilman matched that of female DNA that was recovered from the victim’s sexual assault kit. As a result, Gilman was named in a September 8 criminal information charging her with second-degree rape for assaulting a victim who was “incapable of consenting to sexual intercourse by reason of being physically helpless.”

In a post last month on her Facebook page, Gilman reported, “I’ve got 2months sober and I’m 31 weeks pregnant.” Gilman, the mother of two young children, has struggled with substance abuse for the past several years, according to other Facebook messages.

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Introducing SheTaxis: Cabs Exclusively for Women

And folks say we’re exaggerating the New World Order. Welcome to SheTaxis, New York City taxis exclusively for women. Read it and weep. Better yet, read it with the genders reversed. That’d make front page headlines.

NEW YORK — New Yorkers can already choose from yellow taxis, green cabs or black livery cars. They can tap a smartphone app for a ride, or simply stick out an arm. They can pay with cash or credit.

Now there is one more option: a female driver.

A new livery service starting Sept. 16 in New York City, Westchester County and Long Island will offer female drivers exclusively, for female riders, according to its founder. It will take requests for rides through an app, and dispatch drivers sporting hot pink pashmina scarves.

The service will be called SheTaxis — SheRides in New York City because of regulations barring it from using “taxi” in its name — and aims to serve women who may feel uncomfortable being driven by men, or who simply prefer the company of other women. The app will ask potential riders if there is a woman in their party. If not, they will be automatically redirected to other car services.

The app will be available only through Apple, starting Sept. 16 and will eventually be made available for Android devices.

“Perfect idea,” declared Gretchen Britt, 51, a school clerk in Manhattan who uses cabs and livery cars three to four times a month, always driven by men. “You feel safer and more comfortable with a woman.”

It got a nod from one Bronx man, Gibson Pierrelouis, 22, even though he was told he could not use the service himself. That was fine, he said. He wanted it for his six sisters.

The women’s livery service was started by Stella Mateo, a mother of two daughters, who said she could have used a female driver to help shuttle them to soccer, field hockey, basketball and gymnastics practices when they were growing up. Mateo’s husband, Fernando, is the founder of the New York State Federation of Taxi Drivers, an industry group representing 30,000 taxi and livery drivers.

Mateo said she also saw her service as a way to help women join an industry that has long been dominated by men.

Of New York City’s 59,999 for-hire drivers of livery cars, green cabs, limousines and luxury sedans, only 2,952 of them, or 5 percent, are women, according to city data. Even fewer women drive yellow cabs: 574 out of 51,874 drivers, or 1 percent.

The new women’s service comes as the livery industry has become safer, in part, because of required measures, such as bullet-resistant partitions and security cameras in cars. During the 1990s, dozens of drivers were killed in a single year and many more assaulted or robbed. Even so, it can still be dangerous for men and women alike, as underscored last month by the fatal carjackings involving two male livery drivers in the Bronx.

Miriam Malave, 54, a livery driver in Brooklyn for three decades, said she gets more requests than she can handle, often from Hasidic women who will only ride with women. Even so, she said, she continues to face discrimination from male drivers who tell her: “This is a man’s job. Go home and cook.”

SheTaxis will partner with existing livery companies to provide the rides at competitive rates, Mateo said. SheTaxis, which has a staff of six, has recruited 50 female drivers, ranging in age from 21 to 70. The service will collect fares through its app, using credit or debit cards, and then send payments to the drivers. “I have a lot of friends, they think it’s dangerous picking up guys in the street,” said Stephanie Rodriguez, 21, a college student who earns about $700 a week driving a livery car in the Bronx.

Meera Joshi, chairwoman of the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission, said she saw it as another amenity for riders: “As with so many service industries, the for-hire vehicle industry continues to get more and more specialized in terms of the products and services it offers.”

Mateo said she envisions the livery service expanding to Washington, Miami, Chicago and other cities during the next year. Similar women’s driving services exist in other countries, including India.

At a recent lunch in Manhattan, more than a dozen livery company owners and their representatives welcomed the female drivers, with several noting that women tended to be their best employees. “We can recruit more women and provide better service to the community,” said Jose Viloria, owner of Elegante car service, where only 10 of the 350 drivers are women.

Cristina Velos, an immigrant from the Dominican Republic, said she decided to become a livery driver after 17 years as a hotel housekeeper, earning $25 an hour. “I think there’s more opportunity,” said Velos, 42. “You have more time for family. You feel more comfortable. You never have a supervisor.”

Lizette Colon, 30, a marketing representative for a liquor distributor, said she will not only drive for the service on weekends, she will use it herself when she goes to clubs. If she rides with a male driver, she said, she snaps a picture of his license with her cellphone and sends it to a friend as a precaution. “I really don’t like getting into a car with a stranger,” she said. “You don’t know anything about him.”

Others, like Josephina Soto, 25, an aspiring singer looking for flexible hours, said she saw her new job as empowering to women, both in the front seat and the back. As a teenager, she recalled, she once tired of men flirting with her while she was working out and joined a Lucille Roberts gym for women only.

“This is the cab version of the gym,” she said. “I love the whole SheTaxis thing. Most of the time, there’s a lot of men-to-men stuff, but it’s not usually about the women.”

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Who says chivalry is dead?

During the fourth inning of yesterday’s Boston Red Sox vs. Toronto Blue Jays game at Fenway Park, catcher Christian Vazquez hit a foul ball down the third base line, and the ball girl handed it to a young boy in the stands.

The young boy then turned around immediately gave the ball to a younger girl sitting behind him. Other fans and even the announcers were astounded by the boy’s generosity and kindness.

Wouldn’t it be great if men and women were this cordial to one another?

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